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UCCF continues to be committed to equipping today's Theology students to live and speak for Jesus in their chosen field of study.
Theology Network is now a part of UCCF's Leadership Network, so you can now find our resources at www.uccfleadershipnetwork.org/theology. As a result, this site will be taken down at the beginning of 2019.

 

Category Archives: Studying theology and RS

Struggling with prayer as a theology student?

Studying theology in a secular, university environment can be of real benefit to our devotional life as Christians, but it can also cause real struggles at times. One of the biggest dangers is that we allow our understanding of God’s character to become twisted by our studies in such a way that it negatively affects our communion with Him in prayer. If Archbishop William Temple was right in saying that “Religion is what you do with your solitude” then we need to guard our prayer life at all costs since it is the unseen foundation of our faith.

Most of our difficulties with prayer can be traced back to deficient or wrong views on the doctrine of God. For example, a Christian, having been exposed to the teaching of the New Atheist movement, may begin to doubt that God lovingly cares for her and will lack assurance, faith and tenderness in her prayer life. The solution may come in many forms. Perhaps a reminder of the enduring love between the persons of the Trinity? Or a refreshed knowledge of God’s absolute commitment to His people in sending Christ as substitute? As Keller reminds us, “The reason we know God will answer our prayers is because of that one terrible day when He did not answer Jesus’ prayer”. We will soon find that the depths of God’s character are sufficient to dispel all our misplaced fears as we approach Him in prayer.

It is vital therefore that as Christian theologians we commit both to defending a biblical view of the doctrine of God and, more importantly, commit to developing our own intimate prayer life. The Westminster Shorter Catechism states that the chief end of man is “To glorify God, and to enjoy Him forever”. Let us not be theologians that only read about God but miss out on enjoying Him ourselves!

Josh Oldfield, Theology Network Relay Intern in Edinburgh 2014/15

Theology students’ greatest danger…and privilege!

In his classic address to theology students, BB Warfield says four things we all still need to hear today:

  1. Study hard: you can’t be godly if you don’t
  2. Study theology as worship and devotion
  3. Don’t think you’re too good for church – Jesus went to church!
  4. Most of all, keep love for Christ burning as a fire in your heart

Here he is on the danger of a cold heart:

We are frequently told, indeed, that the great danger of the theological student lies precisely in his constant contact with divine things. They may come to seem common to him, because they are customary. As the average man breathes the air and basks in the sunshine without ever a thought that it is God in his goodness who makes his sun to rise on him, though he is evil, and sends rain to him, though he is unjust; so you may come to handle even the furniture of the sanctuary with never a thought above the gross early materials of which it is made. The words which tell you of God’s terrible majesty or of his glorious goodness may come to be mere words to you— Hebrew and Greek words, with etymologies, and inflections, and connections in sentences. The reasonings which establish to you the mysteries of his saving activities may come to be to you mere logical paradigms, with premises and conclusions, fitly framed, no doubt, and triumphantly cogent, but with no further significance to you than their formal logical conclusiveness. God’s stately stepping in his redemptive processes may become to you a mere series of facts of history, curiously interplaying to the production of social and religious conditions, and pointing mayhap to an issue which we may shrewdly conjecture: but much like other facts occurring in time and space, which may come to your notice. It is your great danger. But it is your great danger, only because it is your great privilege. Think of what your privilege is when your greatest danger is that the great things of religion may become common to you! Other men, oppressed by the hard conditions of life, sunk in the daily struggle for bread perhaps, distracted at any rate by the dreadful drag of the world upon them and the awful rush of the world’s work, find it hard to get time and opportunity so much as to pause and consider whether there be such things as God, and religion, and salvation from the sin that compasses them about and holds them captive. The very atmosphere of your life is these things; you breathe them in at every pore; they surround you, encompass you, press in upon you from every side. It is all in danger of becoming common to you! God forgive you, you are in danger of becoming weary of God!

Do you know what this danger is? Or, rather, let us turn the question—are you alive to what your privileges are? Are you making full use of them? Are you, by this constant contact with divine things, growing in holiness, becoming every day more and more men of God? If not, you are hardening! And I am here today to warn you to take seriously your theological study, not merely as a duty, done for God’s sake and therefore made divine, but as a religious exercise, itself charged with religious blessing to you; as fitted by its very nature to fill all your mind and heart and soul and life with divine thoughts and feelings and aspirations and achievements. You will never prosper in your religious life in the Theological Seminary until your work in the Theological Seminary becomes itself to you a religious exercise out of which you draw every day enlargement of heart, elevation of spirit, and adoring delight in your Maker and your Saviour.

Read the rest

Even more advice to theology students!

The final installment from John Frame:

21. Don’t be one of those theologians who get excited about every new trend in politics, culture, hermeneutics, even theology, and thinks we have to reconstruct our theology to go along with each trend. Don’t think you have to be a feminist, e.g., just because everybody else is. Most of the theologies that try to be culturally savvy are un-Biblical.

22. Be suspicious of all trendiness in theology. When everybody jumps on some theological bandwagon, whether narrative, feminism, redemptive history, natural law, liturgy, liberation, postmodernism, or whatever, that’s the time to awaken your critical faculties. Don’t jump on the bandwagon unless you have done your own study. When a theological trend comes along, ask reflexively, “What’s wrong with that?” For there is always something wrong. It simply is not the case that the newest is the truest. Indeed, many new movements turn out to be false steps entirely.

23. Our system of doctoral level education requires “original thought,” but that can be hard to do, given that the church has been studying Scripture for thousands of years. So you’ll be tempted to come up with something that sounds new (possibly by writing a thesis that isn’t properly theological at all in the sense of #3 above). Well, do it; get it out of the way, and then come back to do some real theology.

24. At the same time, don’t reject innovation simply because it is innovative. Even more, don’t reject an idea merely because it doesn’t SOUND like what you’re used to. Learn to distinguish the sound-look-feel of an idea from what it actually means.

25. Be critical of arguments that turn on metaphors or extra-Biblical technical terms. Don’t assume that each one has a perfectly clear meaning. Usually they do not.

26. Learn to be skeptical of the skeptics. Unbelieving and liberal scholarship are as prone to error as anybody. More so.

27. Respect your elders. Nothing is so ill-becoming as a young theologian who despises those who have been working in the field for decades. Disagreement is fine, as long as you acknowledge the maturity and the contributions of those you disagree with. Take 1 Tim. 5:1 to heart.

28. Young theologians often imagine themselves as the next Luther, just as little boys imagine themselves as the next Eli Manning or Shaquille O’Neal. When they’re too old to play cowboys and Indians, they want to play Luther and the Pope. When the real Pope won’t play with them, they pick on somebody else and say, “You’re it. “ Look: most likely God has not chosen you to be the leader of a new Reformation. If he has, don’t take the exalted title “Reformer” upon yourself. Let others decide if that is really what you are.

29. Decide early in your career (after some experimenting) what to focus on and what not to. When considering opportunities, it’s just as important (perhaps more so) to know when to say no as to know when to say yes.

30. Don’t lose your sense of humor. We should take God seriously, not ourselves, certainly not theology. To lose your sense of humor is to lose your sense of proportion. And nothing is more important in theology than a sense of proportion.

HT: Rev Dr James Dobson via Andy Naselli

More advice for theology students…

From John Frame:

11. If you get a bright idea, don’t expect everybody to get it right away. Don’t immediately start a faction to promote it. Don’t revile those who haven’t come to appreciate your thinking. Reason gently with them, recognizing that you could be wrong, and arrogant to boot.

12. Don’t be reflexively critical of everything that comes out of a different tradition. Be humble enough to consider that other traditions may have something to teach you. Be teachable before you start teaching them. Take the beam out of your own eye.

13. Be willing to re-examine your own tradition with a critical eye. It is unreasonable to think that any single tradition has all the truth or is always right. And unless theologians develop critical perspectives on their own denominations and traditions, the reunion of the body of Christ will never take place. Don’t be one of those theologians who are known mainly for trying to make Arminians become Calvinists (or vice versa).

14. See confessional documents in proper perspective. It is the work of theology, among other things, to rethink the doctrines of the confessions and to reform them, when necessary, by the Word of God. Do not assume that everything in the confession is forever settled.

15. Don’t let your polemics be governed by jealousy, as when a theologian feels bound to be entirely negative toward the success of a mega-church.

16. Don’t become known as a theologian who constantly takes potshots at other theologians or other Christians. The enemy is Satan, the world, and the flesh.

17. Guard your sexual instincts. Stay away from Internet pornography and illicit relationships. Theologians are not immune from the sins that plague others in the church.

18. Be active in a good church. Theologians need the means of grace as much as other believers. This is especially important when you are studying at a secular university or liberal seminary. You need the support of other believers to maintain proper theological perspective.

19. Get your basic training at a seminary that teaches the Bible as the word of God. Become well-grounded in the theology of Scripture, before you go off (as you may, of course) to get first-hand exposure to non-Biblical thought.

20. Come to appreciate the wisdom, even theological wisdom, of relatively uneducated Christians. Don’t be one of those theologians who always has something negative to say when a simple believer describes his walk with the Lord. Don’t look down at people from what Helmut Thielicke called “the high horse of enlightenment.” Often, simple believers know God better than you do, and you need to learn from them, as did Abraham Kuyper for instance.

HT: Rev Dr James Dobson via Andy Naselli

So you’re about to start studying theology…?

For all those about to start a degree in theology (or biblical or religious studies too), here’s part one of John Frame’s 30 pieces of advice to theological students and young theologians:

1. Consider that you might not really be called to theological work. James 3:1 tells us that not many of us should become teachers. And he says that teachers will be judged more strictly. To whom much (Biblical knowledge) is given, of them shall much be required.
 
2. Value your relationship with Christ, your family, and the church above your career ambitions. You will influence more people by your life than by your theology. And deficiencies in your life will negate the influence of your ideas, even if those ideas are true.
 
3. Remember that the fundamental work of theology is to understand the Bible, God’s word, and apply it to the needs of people. Everything else: historical and linguistic expertise, exegetical acuteness and subtlety, knowledge of contemporary culture, philosophical sophistication, must be subordinated to that fundamental goal. If it is not, you may be acclaimed as a historian, linguist, philosopher, or critic of culture, but you will not be a theologian.
 
4. In doing the work of theology (the fundamental work, #3), you have an obligation to make a case for what you advocate. That should be obvious, but most theologians today haven’t a clue as to how to do it. Theology is an argumentative discipline, and you need to know enough about logic and persuasion to construct arguments that are valid, sound and persuasive. In theology, it’s not enough to display a knowledge of history, culture, or some other knowledge. Nor is it enough to quote people you agree with and reprobate people you don’t agree with. You actually have to make a theological case for what you say.
 
5. Learn to write and speak clearly and cogently. The best theologians are able to take profound ideas and present them in simple language. Don’t try to persuade people of your expertise by writing in opaque prose.
 
6. Cultivate an intense devotional life, and ignore people who criticize this as pietistic. Pray without ceasing. Read the Bible, not just as an academic text. Treasure opportunities 40 to worship in chapel services and prayer meetings, as well as on Sunday. Give attention to your “spiritual formation,” however you understand that.
 
7. A theologian is essentially a preacher, though he typically deals with more arcane subjects than preachers do. But be a good preacher. Find some way to make your theology speak to the hearts of people. Find a way to present your teaching so that people hear God’s voice in it.
 
8. Be generous with your resources. Spend time talking to students, prospective students, inquirers. Give away books and articles. Don’t be tight-fisted when it comes to copyrighted materials; grant copy permission to anybody who asks for it. Ministry first, money second.
 
9. In criticizing other theologians, traditions, or movements, follow Biblical ethics. Don’t say that somebody is a heretic unless you have a very good case. Don’t throw around terms like “another gospel.” (People who teach another gospel are under God’s curse.) Don’t destroy people’s reputations by misquoting them, or quoting them out of context, or taking their words in the worst possible sense. Be gentle and gracious unless you have irrefutable reasons for being harsh.
 
10. When there is a controversy, don’t get on one side right away. Do some analytical work first, on both positions. Consider these possibilities: (a) that the two parties may be looking at the same issue from different perspectives, so they don’t really contradict; (b) that both parties are overlooking something that could have brought them together; (c) that they are talking past one another because they use terms in different ways; (d) that there is a third alternative that is better than either of the opposing views and that might bring them together; (e)that their differences, though genuine, ought both to be tolerated in the church, like the differences between vegetarians and meat-eaters in Rom. 14.

HT: Rev Dr James Dobson via Andy Naselli